JMVRI Issue Number 18

JMVRI Issue No. 18 is a special Issue devoted to the theme of poetry and language. It encompasses two important lectures by Maharishi Mahesh Yogi on his deep understanding of poetry in relation to the Veda and the structure of pure knowledge within consciousness, entitled: Poetry and the Veda and Poetry and the Veda: The Flow of Life in the Currents of Wisdom, Part I.

This Issue also includes a chapter by American writer Dr Frederick (Fred) Worth (Ph.D. in Romance Languages and Literature, Harvard University) from his forthcoming volume Manifold Poetry: The Origami of Consciousness in Word, Line, and Form, plus a selection of his poems titled Walking the Grid / Dancing the Spiral and Other Poems. The final inclusion in Issue No. 18 is a suite of poems by Peruvian poet Javier Ortiz Cabrejos published in Spanish and English entitled Selected Poems.

JMVRI Issue Number 18

JMVRI Paper 18.1

Poetry and the Veda

Author: Maharishi Mahesh Yogi

This paper can be downloaded via the following link:

https://www.academia.edu/attachments/79049249/download_file?s=portfolio

Citation: Maharishi Mahesh Yogi. (2022). Poetry and the Veda. Journal of Maharishi Vedic Research Institute, 18, 15-19.

Summary (excerpt): 

Different forms in their underlying connectedness create a poem sung by the Creator, continuously being enjoyed by the Creator. Poetry, like any other art, is the springing of the waves of life wherever there is connectedness—a very beautiful word. Connectedness justifies these high and low waves of expression. We were talking of the Veda this morning. It happens to be that the truths of creation are expressed in what we call poetry. Poetry has as its characteristic this connectedness of different expressions, and this in itself gives us a clue to the knowledge of life. There is something underlying which connects all the different forms and phenomena.

JMVRI Paper 18.2

Poetry and the Veda: The Flow of Life in the Currents of Wisdom, Part I

Author: Maharishi Mahesh Yogi

This paper can be downloaded via the following link:

https://www.academia.edu/attachments/79049289/download_file?s=portfolio

Citation: Maharishi Mahesh Yogi. (2022). Poetry and the Veda: The flow of life in the currents of wisdom, part I. Journal of Maharishi Vedic Research Institute, 18, 21-29.

Summary (excerpt):

All successful poets have tracked the path of transcending. They start from what the eyes see, or the hands feel, or the ears hear, and they travel into space and time and direct their focus onto the beyond. Poetry has a rhythm like the beat of the heart. It is a beautiful expression. It is the heart that flows in poetry, and to connect the rhythm of a poem with the beat of the heart is a very successful gesture of the speaker.

JMVRI Paper 18.3

Poetry and the Origami of Consciousness: The Folding / Unfolding of Word, Line, and Form

Author: Frederick R. Worth

This paper can be downloaded via the following link:

https://www.academia.edu/attachments/79049322/download_file?s=portfolio

Citation: Worth, F. R. (2022). Poetry and the origami of consciousness: The folding / unfolding of word, line, and form. Journal of Maharishi Vedic Research Institute, 18, 31-67.

Summary (excerpt):

This paper is an excerpt from the forthcoming volume Manifold Poetry: The Origami of Consciousness in Word, Line, and Form, a book inspired and informed on many levels by the teachings of Maharishi Mahesh Yogi’s Vedic Science, absorbed over the course of several decades. The selection printed here appears at a point midway through the book where my ideas around the concept of “origami” in poetry are just beginning to form and take wing. In this context, due to the pithiness of its statement, my choice of an expression from the Bhagavad-Gīta, Chapter 9, Verse 8, was in many ways key to my being able to introduce in a simple, general manner my idea of “the Fold” and various ensuing folding processes in the early stages of a poem’s development to the book’s readers.

JMVRI Paper 18.4

Walking the Grid / Dancing the Spiral and Other Poems

Author: Frederick R. Worth

This paper can be downloaded via the following link:

https://www.academia.edu/attachments/79049360/download_file?s=portfolio

Citation: Worth, F. R. (2022). Walking the grid / dancing the spiral and other poems. Journal of Maharishi Vedic Research Institute, 18, 69-109.

Summary (excerpt):

The first three poems address poetry either directly or indirectly. “Corrida” envisions poetry as the transcendental equivalent of the bullfight, abounding in symbols of light and darkness, tragedy and triumph. The traje de luces is the dazzlingly brilliant suit of gold braid and sequins (“brilliant like the sun”) worn by the bullfighter, or torero. “Winged words” probably needs no explanation. It’s about the birth of poetry from a place of silent, creative darkness (such as a bird’s nest inside a hollow tree trunk). The quetzal is a strikingly beautiful, iridescent green bird (with red belly) that sports an elegant, long tail. It is native to Central America. “Swimming Pool” likens poetry to both a refreshing dip in the wet and a dive into the transcendent. Swimming pool as a stand-in for the meditation hall. Painter David Hockney’s swimming pools are distinguished by their signature splash. I have an affinity with members of the mineral realm, the world of stones. Apparently Pablo Neruda did as well. He wrote a book of poems (Piedras del cielo/Stones of the Sky) in praise of turquoise, amethyst, diamond, topaz and others. Hence, “Plume Agate,” an ode in the style of Neruda. The remaining poems all have to do with experiences or inspirations encountered while on the journey.

JMVRI Paper 18.5

Selected Poems

Author: Javier Ortiz Cabrejos

This paper can be downloaded via the following link:

https://www.academia.edu/attachments/79049380/download_file?s=portfolio

Citation: Ortiz Cabrejos, J. (2022). Selected poems. Journal of Maharishi Vedic Research Institute, 18, 111-203.

Summary (excerpt):

The poems by Peruvian poet Javier Ortiz Cabrejos appear both in their original Spanish and in English translation. The majority of selections present the poems and their English translation side-by-side, page-by-page except for Los Ríos Del Océano (Rivers of the Ocean) where the original poem in Spanish is presented completely followed by its English translation. Translations were made by Dr Evelyn Toft and Dr Tina Rivera and reviewed by the author.

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